International Security Affiliates

International Security Affiliates A * International Security Affiliates is not security guard company. We are Global provider of Threa

We are Global provider of Threat Management Services, with more then 30 years of exemplary service to our clientele. Affiliates world wide allows us to offer our services on a global range, from low level of security to high profile personal protection. Our full range of services can be viewed at:

www.isaexecutivprotection.com

12/21/2020
03/08/2020

Info. from one of our industry's professional.
Creator of the FBI’s Close Protection School, James Hamilton, shares 20 Quick Tips for Executive Protection –forged by GDBA’s 40 years of protection experience.

I have trained Executive Protection professionals at the highest levels for decades. Consequently, I am often asked about the “Dos and Don’ts” guiding elite protectors. My answer always includes GDBA’s, “The Way of a Superior Protector.” This quick checklist offers hard lessons forged over the last forty years, where GDBA has provided over 14 million hours of protective service to some of the world’s most at-risk individuals, families, and enterprises.

Of course, this list is not all encompassing. These tips, however, are an excellent guide for protectors who seek self-improvement. If we could get all “Protectors” in the industry to just observe #8, we would be better off for it.

Thanks for reading.

-James Hamilton

THE WAY OF THE SUPERIOR PROTECTOR

Stays in the NOW – not distracted by past or future events
Is always prepared for an immediate and unexpected departure (cars at the ready, available foot-route, clear access to exits).
Does not eat or drink anything in public view, and NEVER eats with principals and/or principal staff, even if invited repeatedly. Declines artfully and honestly (“Being at the same table with you would give me poor positioning for my mission, would not help you, and is absolutely prohibited by my firm. You are gracious, and I am grateful – and also committed to my mission.”)
Maintains physical and mental readiness.
Does not chew gum while working.
Maintains awareness of the environment at all times, even when talking with someone (does not need to look at that person).
Has zero communication with reporters unless it is needed for a logistical benefit to the protectee, and approved by a team leader; otherwise, a superior protector doesn’t say a word.
Keeps coat unbuttoned for quick access to gear at all times.
Limits radio communication to information that serves the mission.
Does not stand close to other protectors while posted.
Drives with noticeable slowness while in public view and when media are present.
Keeps head up and eyes working during radio communication.
Doesn’t sit, lean or slouch, and keeps hands at the ready.
Is aware at all times that he/she might be filmed/recorded.
Keeps Operations Order readily available.
Constantly re-evaluates physical position, and improves position if possible.
Keeps extra radio battery and cell phone fully charged.
Maintains excellent personal appearance (gear covered, clothes clean and pressed, shoes polished, hair groomed, conservative clothing, clean-shaven, no cologne or scented products).
Keeps appropriate nourishment on hand.
Doesn’t wear sunglasses unless otherwise unable to see (e.g., posted in direct sunlight).

11/19/2019

How Mexico’s ‘Small Armies’ Came to Commit a Massacre

How did two lesser-known criminal groups come to commit a massacre in Mexico?

Two lesser-known criminal groups have grabbed headlines in recent weeks for their suspected role in the brazen ambush and murder of women and children in northern Mexico, but how did these so-called “small armies” emerge in the first place?

The group of 17 family members from a prominent American Mormon family were traveling in three vehicles when armed gunmen opened fire on the convoy. Nine US citizens — three women and six children — were killed in the onslaught near the small town of Bavispe in northwest Sonora state along the US-Mexico border.

At the center of what lead to the attack weren’t Mexico’s traditional cartel powerhouses, but rather two smaller criminal groups: one known as Los Salazar that is linked to the Sinaloa Cartel and operates in Sonora state, and another called La Línea, a faction of the Juárez Cartel with a strong presence in Chihuahua state.

The LeBarón family had for years denounced the presence of and threats made by organized crime groups in this lawless frontier. In 2009, two of their family members were kidnapped and murdered in Chihuahua. More recently, however, the family and Los Salazar in Sonora had reached a peaceful coexistence.

SEE ALSO: Mexico News and Profiles

“Basically, it was ‘We won’t bother you if you don’t bother us,’” one family member told the Washington Post.

That all changed on November 4.

There were rumors about an escalating turf war in the months leading up to the deadly attack. Los Salazar in Sonora had allegedly asked the LeBarón family living in La Mora not to buy fuel from neighboring Chihuahua, which they argued was funding their rivals in La Línea, according to the Washington Post.

On the other hand, La Línea perceived the potential incursion of Los Salazar into Chihuahua as a direct threat to their operations, and decided to send a violent message in response, according to General Homero Mendoza, chief of staff of the Defense Ministry (Secretaría de la Defensa Nacional — Sedena).

With the attack, La Línea made it clear to their rivals in Los Salazar who controlled the highway crossing from Sonora into Chihuahua and eventually up to the US border. Such routes are vital for smuggling drugs and migrants and facilitating other lucrative criminal economies.
InSight Crime Analysis

The armed group alleged to be behind the massacre in Sonora emerged years ago as part of the outsourcing of security by Mexico’s most dominant cartels. While starting out as small family-based operations, these networks eventually expanded, leading to rising profits and the militarization of their drug trafficking activities.

Beyond securing their own areas of influence, the cartels were now also competing for control of drug smuggling corridors known as “plazas.” By winning a specific plaza, the dominant criminal group could charge a “piso,” or tax, to any other group moving contraband like weapons, humans or drugs through the area. This tax system provided another significant revenue steam.

To win these plaza battles, however, it was essential to have a greater number of loyal foot soldiers willing to fight to the death.

For the Tijuana Cartel, the Arellano Félix family looked across the border to members of San Diego’s Logan Street Gang, which they provided with weapons and tactical training. Members of the Mexican Airborne Special Forces Group (Grupo Aeromóvil de Fuerzas Especiales — GAFES) were employed by the Gulf Cartel to be its enforcer wing, which later became known as the Zetas.

For its part, the Sinaloa Cartel used an internal faction of the group known as the Beltran Leyva Organization to form a mini army supported by smaller street gangs in areas the group controlled along the US-Mexico border to combat its rivals. The Juárez Cartel hired current and former Mexican police officers to form La Línea, in addition to working with an El Paso-based street gang known as the Aztecas.

SEE ALSO: Juárez Cartel News and Profile

Over time, however, the structure of Mexico’s cartels changed and became less hierarchical. These armed wings developed more financial and decision making authority, as well as more autonomy. This in turn allowed them to expand outside of just providing security to engage in their own criminal activities, such as demanding extortion payments from local businesses and kidnapping. The Zetas, for example, would eventually break away from the Gulf Cartel and transform into one of Mexico’s most ruthless criminal groups for a time.

La Línea also rose to prominence, even finding itself in the crosshairs of the US Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI). The group’s former leader, Carlos Arturo Quintana Quintana, alias “El 80,” made it onto the bureau’s most wanted list before he was arrested in May of 2018 after a blood-soaked criminal career that spanned nearly a decade.

Under Quintana’s command, La Línea bought off several municipal police forces and co-opted political operators in northwest Chihuahua to facilitate the Juárez Cartel’s drug trafficking operations through Ciudad Juárez and over the US-Mexico border.

The ongoing turf war for control of key trafficking and smuggling routes in the northern Mexican states of Chihuahua and Sonora dates back more than a decade. But while some of the country’s so-called “small armies” have come and past, La Línea’s brutal show of force against Los Salazar at the expense of the LeBarón family suggests they might be a critical piece of the Juárez Cartel’s plans to reign supreme once again in their former stronghold.

10/19/2019

Active shooter
The reality that the vast majority of security staff will be unarmed, and therefore no more of a deterrent to an active shooter, then the people they are supposed to protect, in other words useless. That leaves the four choices that have previously been voiced by others. Generally, most so-called security experts recommend only three courses of actions.
We recommend one additional
First asset situation don’t just run / spread out - don’t huddle together
First Run; if you can get out of the area do so. Be aware where you are at all times and know where the exits are (Situational Awareness). Have a plan and look for the unusual exits, out the kitchen in a restaurant, the back of a store in the mall, etc… Stay low, move, and keep hold of small children and loved ones.
Second Hide; again know where you are and where possible safe areas are located. Most offices, stores, and schools have not typically been designed with safe rooms in mind. If it is your workplace, school, look around and find where are rooms that you can secure yourself and others in. With regards to others, my recommendation is don’t waste time trying to convince someone to move (Other than family. Then they are being carried out.).
Lastly, Fight; when dealing with active shooter begging and crying will not spare you. Throw things, look for opportunities while they are reloading, but when there is no other choice get anyone you can to join you and fight.
Lastly, I highly recommend that people learn basic trauma medical skills and carry a basic kit. In an active shooter situation emergency medical response will most likely be delayed getting into the area where victims are. Self and buddy aid will save lives. Most of these incidents are not spontaneous, they are planned and there is almost always someone who after says something like “Yeah he said he hated so and so and was going to get him. But I thought he/she was kidding.” In conclusion, be alert if you see something say something. If you have a friend, associate or coworker who talks about committing acts of violence let someone know. Any early intervention could save lives.

09/07/2019

Info. concerning ISA's travel security services:



Myths There are many myths and half-truths about crisis, disruption and threats within the travel management sector. Much of this misinformation has originated from travelers themselves, media, travel managers, friends and family or so called “experts”. For example, many travelers and planners are focused on terrorism. The reality is, you have a very, very small chance of being exposed or affected directly by a terrorist act. It doesn’t mean you should discount it as a threat altogether but it shouldn’t dominate your plans or processes if not a proportional threat to you and your travelers. Conversely, almost everyone overlooks motor vehicle accidents. Yet, they happen far more frequently, can have a devastating effect on travelers and are the least common plan contained within company travel management departments. Travelers and travel managers must be prepared, educated and have supporting plans for any event that has the potential to delay, disrupt or harm the traveler or the business. The most common events include:

Motor vehicle accidents
Airline delays or cancellations
Airport closures or disruptions
Transport delays
Bad weather
Sickness and illness
Petty crimes
Hotel fires
Political disputes
Demonstrations and gatherings
Call us if you are in need of travell security in your
business & leisure voyages.

09/07/2019
International Security Affiliates

International Security Affiliates

Cybersecurity Best Practices for SMBs
By Jen D., December 20, 2018
Having cameras installed at your small business or office is no longer enough. While necessary in-office safety measures at your place of work are still imperative, the newest needs in security stem from the cyber realm. Your small business deserves to be protected from threat, without spending all of your earnings.
Together we will explore the latest cybersecurity risks, how you can protect your business, and where you get the most bang for your buck! We will also find out if managed security services are a worthwhile or affordable idea for most small businesses.
Small Business Cyber Security Best Practices
Many businesses want to make sure their cybersecurity is up to date and useful, but either spend their budget for cybersecurity ineffectually or don’t feel they have the funds to be protected. In reality, a large portion of cybersecurity merely is about maintenance and can be done cheaply, apart from the labor of these steps being implemented.
Step 1: Password Overhaul
Perhaps you choose your passwords wisely, but what about other top-level employees. Having a basic password (or the father of all bad passwords, the word PASSWORD itself!), puts your business at risk. The same goes for all frequently used and simple concept passwords.
Another mistake is using the same password for all your accounts, perhaps at home and beyond. Use different passwords. That way, even if one account is compromised, your other accounts remain secure. Having trouble remembering different passwords? Consider purchasing a “password manager,” to keep better track. These can be under $20 to about $50.
Step 2: Remove Old Accounts
Employees come and go, but if you leave their accounts open and unused, you have a cybersecurity risk that might expose sensitive information. Your small businesses old online accounts are a risk and not as harmless as you think.
Not only could former employees gain access to confidential, current information about your business, but hackers could break into those accounts without you ever knowing (as security warnings would go to old unchecked email addresses). Cleanse your digital palate and delete and remove old accounts!
Step 3: Two-Factor Authentication
Sure, two-factor authentication can feel like a time-consuming waste of time, until you are hacked! Worse, what if the hack exposes more than general business information and leaks the private details (name, social security number, driver’s license, etc.) of you or your employees. Potentially even your client’s credit card information or private information might be revealed. When your customer base finds out, you could have a PR disaster on your hands and lose consumer trust.
How does 2 factor authentication work?
After entering in your (correct) password, you will typically be prompted to enter a code that you will receive on another device (by text or email) and then use that code to gain access. More complicated systems can also use facial recognition technology or fingerprint scan.
Step 4: Software Strong
You have software that you paid quite a bit of money for. Do yourself a favor and update it. Software updates exist for a reason. Frequently the updates contain edits to problems within systems and corrections to vulnerabilities in software.
When hackers find out software is vulnerable, they immediately use that information themselves and share it on the dark web. This means that hackers will seek out those companies who use the software so they can invade and steal credit card numbers, SSN’s, and more.

Step 5: Train Staff
Security alerts should go to specific individuals within your business, and those persons should be trained on what to look for. Also, ALL staff should be warned about what to do if they opened a suspicious email/download and told to avoid downloading or going to third-party links via email. Businesses are prime targets for hackers.
While a solution to the above might appear to be hiring a managed security service, Business Insider’s review of Trustwave’s recent survey reveal that 30% of security investments are never used or wasted. If you’re trying to save money, do the above steps consistently and save money, while still being secure. Although it’s wise to have a computer technician a call away for emergency services, a managed service won’t fix all those concerns.
Interested in searching out your small business’s web trail to see what is already on the web?
Try a reverse image search of your company’s copyrighted material and images. Or, see if your personal information has been leaked by online hackers:

06/20/2019
Travel

For information concerning international travel, threat briefings, etc.

The U.S. Department of State website is always a pretty decent starting point for regional travel information and travel advisory : https://travel.state.gov

Links to external websites are provided as a convenience and should not be construed as an endorsement by the U.S. Department of State of the views or products contained therein. If you wish to remain on travel.state.gov, click the "cancel" message.

05/26/2019

May 17, 2019
FBI, Law Enforcement Partners Warn of New Twist in Virtual Kidnapping Scams

TUCSON, AZ—The FBI and our law enforcement partners are warning the public about a new, concerning twist on virtual kidnapping for ransom scams (VKFR), where criminals are convincing U.S. victims to cross the border into Mexico.

Law enforcement agencies have been warning the public of virtual kidnapping schemes for some time. Virtual kidnappings happen when a victim is told, over the phone, that his or her family member has been kidnapped. Then, through deception and threats, criminals coerce victims to pay a ransom. The criminals also threaten harm to the party(s) if they call law enforcement or alert authorities. No one is physically kidnapped in these schemes, but they are often traumatic for everyone involved. On average, the family sends thousands of dollars to the scammers before contacting law enforcement.

In this new twist, extortionists are calling rooms at U.S. hotels near the border and telling guests that the hotel is surrounded by armed enforcers. The criminals convince the guests to leave their hotel and drive across the border to a Mexico-based hotel. The extortionist then convinces the victim to video-call them and take a screenshot. The criminals will then send the photo to the victim’s family, convince them that their loved-one is kidnapped, and coerce them to pay a ransom.

It’s important to note that the victims are crossing into Mexico on their own, but are doing so under the fear of death. Victims report that the threats feel frighteningly real. In one instance, a victim was convinced to stay in a hotel room for multiple nights. In another instance, the victim’s co-workers armed themselves inside a hotel room thinking there were armed criminals outside, who were after them. In both cases, which were investigated by the Nogales Police Department, the victims were safely recovered by authorities after they were alerted.

Between 2013 and 2015, investigators were tracking virtual kidnapping calls from Mexico—almost all of these schemes originated from within Mexican prisons. In this latest twist, the criminals may believe that they have more control over the victims once they lure them across the border into Mexico, thinking it could be easier for them to further extort the victims or their families.

The FBI believes most virtual kidnappings for ransom remain unreported. We hope to raise awareness about this most recent scheme and equip individuals with the knowledge they need to avoid becoming a victim of this crime.

If you get this type of call, whether you think it’s an extortion scheme or a legitimate kidnapping, contact law enforcement immediately.

To avoid becoming a victim, look for these possible indicators:

Multiple successive phone calls
Calls do not come from the kidnapped victim’s phone
Callers go to great lengths to keep you on the phone
Callers prevent you from calling or locating the “kidnapped” victim
Ransom money is only accepted via wire transfer service

If you receive a phone call from someone who demands payment of a ransom for a kidnapped victim, the following should be considered:

Stay calm
Slow the situation down
Avoid sharing information about you or your family during the call
Listen carefully to the voice of the kidnapped victim
Attempt to call or determine the location of the “kidnapped” victim
Request to speak to the victim; ask for “proof of life”
Ask questions only the victim would know
Request the kidnapped victim call back from his/her cell phone
Try to use another means of contacting the family member that has allegedly been kidnapped

For more information or to request interviews, please contact:

FBI Phoenix Division
Jill McCabe, Public Affairs Specialist
[email protected], (623) 466-1844

Nogales Police Department
Officer Oscar Mesta, Public Information Officer
[email protected]

Pima County Sheriff’s Department
Public Information Office
[email protected]

Santa Cruz County Sheriff’s Office
Sheriff Tony Estrada, 520-761-7869

Cochise County Sheriff’s Office
Carol Capas
[email protected], 520-559-4920

Yuma County Sheriff’s Office
Alfonso Zavala, Public Information Officer
[email protected]

05/12/2019

Cybersecurity Best Practices for SMBs
By Jen D., December 20, 2018
Having cameras installed at your small business or office is no longer enough. While necessary in-office safety measures at your place of work are still imperative, the newest needs in security stem from the cyber realm. Your small business deserves to be protected from threat, without spending all of your earnings.
Together we will explore the latest cybersecurity risks, how you can protect your business, and where you get the most bang for your buck! We will also find out if managed security services are a worthwhile or affordable idea for most small businesses.
Small Business Cyber Security Best Practices
Many businesses want to make sure their cybersecurity is up to date and useful, but either spend their budget for cybersecurity ineffectually or don’t feel they have the funds to be protected. In reality, a large portion of cybersecurity merely is about maintenance and can be done cheaply, apart from the labor of these steps being implemented.
Step 1: Password Overhaul
Perhaps you choose your passwords wisely, but what about other top-level employees. Having a basic password (or the father of all bad passwords, the word PASSWORD itself!), puts your business at risk. The same goes for all frequently used and simple concept passwords.
Another mistake is using the same password for all your accounts, perhaps at home and beyond. Use different passwords. That way, even if one account is compromised, your other accounts remain secure. Having trouble remembering different passwords? Consider purchasing a “password manager,” to keep better track. These can be under $20 to about $50.
Step 2: Remove Old Accounts
Employees come and go, but if you leave their accounts open and unused, you have a cybersecurity risk that might expose sensitive information. Your small businesses old online accounts are a risk and not as harmless as you think.
Not only could former employees gain access to confidential, current information about your business, but hackers could break into those accounts without you ever knowing (as security warnings would go to old unchecked email addresses). Cleanse your digital palate and delete and remove old accounts!
Step 3: Two-Factor Authentication
Sure, two-factor authentication can feel like a time-consuming waste of time, until you are hacked! Worse, what if the hack exposes more than general business information and leaks the private details (name, social security number, driver’s license, etc.) of you or your employees. Potentially even your client’s credit card information or private information might be revealed. When your customer base finds out, you could have a PR disaster on your hands and lose consumer trust.
How does 2 factor authentication work?
After entering in your (correct) password, you will typically be prompted to enter a code that you will receive on another device (by text or email) and then use that code to gain access. More complicated systems can also use facial recognition technology or fingerprint scan.
Step 4: Software Strong
You have software that you paid quite a bit of money for. Do yourself a favor and update it. Software updates exist for a reason. Frequently the updates contain edits to problems within systems and corrections to vulnerabilities in software.
When hackers find out software is vulnerable, they immediately use that information themselves and share it on the dark web. This means that hackers will seek out those companies who use the software so they can invade and steal credit card numbers, SSN’s, and more.

Step 5: Train Staff
Security alerts should go to specific individuals within your business, and those persons should be trained on what to look for. Also, ALL staff should be warned about what to do if they opened a suspicious email/download and told to avoid downloading or going to third-party links via email. Businesses are prime targets for hackers.
While a solution to the above might appear to be hiring a managed security service, Business Insider’s review of Trustwave’s recent survey reveal that 30% of security investments are never used or wasted. If you’re trying to save money, do the above steps consistently and save money, while still being secure. Although it’s wise to have a computer technician a call away for emergency services, a managed service won’t fix all those concerns.
Interested in searching out your small business’s web trail to see what is already on the web?
Try a reverse image search of your company’s copyrighted material and images. Or, see if your personal information has been leaked by online hackers:

03/05/2019

A Very Brief Introduction To Hostile Surveillance by Ami Toben
In the shadowy and oftentimes misunderstood field of criminal activity and terrorism, hostile surveillance is one of the least understood factors. The goal of this article is to very briefly explain a few factors about hostile surveillance, as we search for ways in which conventional security personnel can mitigate its effects.
Though the term surveillance can be generally applied to various types of activities and electronic measures, this article is dedicated to the HUMINT type of physical surveillance, which can be defined as: The covert observation of a target for the purpose of collecting information. This short sentence is loaded with the three key ingredients of surveillance. The first two ingredients are covertness and physical observation – take one of these factors out, and you no longer have what we consider surveillance. If physical observation is done overtly, willingly allowing the target (or anyone else) to see it, then this would simply be physical observation rather than surveillance. Conversely, if an operative is conducting him/herself in such a covert manner that he/she cannot really observe the target, then this would simply be hiding undercover rather than conducting surveillance. The fact that physical surveillance necessarily combines observation and covertness is one of the main reasons why surveillance is such a challenging undertaking. The third ingredient of surveillance is collection information. After all, such challenging and risky activities aren’t simply performed for the fun of it. The goal of hostile surveillance – the entire reason for doing it in the first place – is to collect crucial information that is necessary for planning an attack.
The first thing to understand about operational surveillance is that it is a process that begins before any direct observation on the target takes place. The process begins with an operative (we will use a single operative for simplicity’s sake) moving through the area of the target in order to gain a better understanding of the general character and tempo of the area. Most importantly, the operative needs to locate at least one good vantage point on the target. A vantage point is a location from which the operative can conduct surveillance, and a good surveillance vantage point is one that will give the operative access to a large amount of visual information, while allowing him/her to collect this information covertly.
Considering the amount of time that needs to be spent at a vantage point, it would be unwise for an operative to hastily position him/herself at that location before it is better understood. This is because if the operative is not in tune with the appearance and behavior of the people in that environment, he/she will look out of place; thereby diminishing his/her level of covertness. Say, for example, a vantage point happens to be a park bench at a block’s distance from the target. What the operative would need to do is discover what type of people spend time on that bench, what these people look like and how these people behave, and then adjust his/her appearance and behavior in order to blend into this environment. In order to do this, the operative will need to find a suitable location from which to collect information on the vantage point – a vantage point on the vantage point. This second vantage point will ideally be a location from which the operative cannot even see the target, because that would in turn mean that the target cannot see the operative either. Sticking with the example of the park bench, the second vantage point might be a farther away bench in the same park, or a coffee shop facing the bench but not the target.
After spending some time observing this bench, if it turns out for example that the vantage point bench is usually occupied by homeless people, then the operative will adopt the cover of a homeless person – dressing and behaving in tune with the homeless people who usually occupy the bench. By the time the operative is ready to physically occupy the vantage point, and thus assume all the risks that are associated with conducting hostile surveillance, the operative can seemingly act and appear completely normal.
I often find myself in front of surprised security and law enforcement professionals – many of which are seasoned veterans – when I explain that they can no longer solely depend on the old fashioned idea of looking for suspicious individuals observing the target, or even individuals who just seem out of place. The first thing a well trained surveillance operative will do (and there are plenty of them out there) is make sure they blend perfectly into their environment – that’s what I was trained to do, and there’s no reason to simply assume that hostile surveillance operatives won’t do the same.
It’s not my intention to be an alarmist, nor do I claim that all hostile surveillance is conducted on such a high level, I’m simply advocating that as we hope for the best we should prepare for the worst, and it’s a good idea to learn a thing or two about the ‘worst’ if we want to seriously prepare for it. Painful experience reminds us that there’s no shortage of intelligence agencies, both past and present, that have trained many individuals to conduct hostile surveillance on this level; to name just a few: the Iranian intelligence agency, the Pakistani ISI, Syrian intelligence, Libyan intelligence, and many of the former communist Eastern Bloc intelligence agencies – most notably the KGB and the East German Stasi – have all contributed in this way to terrorist attacks.
As soon as we accept the fact that not all hostile surveillance can be exposed by simply looking for suspicious individuals, the question becomes what CAN be done about it? What DO we look for?

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120 W Country Club Boulevard , # 2776
Big Bear City, CA
92314

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